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Saturday, May 26, 2007

How to Tie BFT's Hemp-Strapped Huarache Running Sandals



Watch this video to learn how I tie my hemp-strapped huarache running sandals.


Organic Hemp Huaraches

My newest huarache running sandal uses braided organic hemp for strapping and Vibram Cherry soling material. This is a 100 mile mountain trail running sandal. Sole and hemp could handle 500 miles in stride.

You can make your own. Within one year of focused pursuit, I can't imagine why anyone with a desire to make their own 100 mile shoes couldn't do it, so just DO IT!


My Latigo Leather Huaraches
After Copper Canyon Ultra Marathon 2007
Photo Andrew Labbe


I am now offering huarache running sandal kits and custom made sandals, go to:

http://barefootted.com/shop


BFT

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9 Comments:

Blogger Josue said...

I just went on a six mile trail run with some mud in my huaraches. I know it is not heavy testing yet, but I will continue to do so.
I thoroughly enjoyed the run with only minor lace rub (due to tight lacing on the right foot).
The downside of the huaraches is definitely when you get them in mud. I stopped a few times to floss the area between my feet and the footbed with grass. I do not even think there is a way to keep them from getting slippery in the mud, except maybe a very textured footbed. I love them!!!

Now that I watched your video, I realize I did not tie them exactly right.

-Josue Stephens

Saturday, May 26, 2007

 
Blogger Barefoot Ted said...

Howdy Josue

Great testing.

Yeah, mud is a tough one. My biggest problems with the huaraches has
come from getting them slippery inside. The first material I used did
not grip even when wet from heavy sweating.

The new material allows for sweating and some moisture, but as soon as
that floor bed gets slippery, you are out-of-luck.

Same with the FFs. If the Classic gets slippery inside the shoe - watch out!

BFT

PS. Keep the reports coming.

Saturday, May 26, 2007

 
Blogger Mike said...

Ted I love looking through you site and I think you are the first who turned me on to Erwan and the Natural Method of training. I really enjoy running around the desert barefoot here in north western Arizona. However sometimes in summer the temp is 120 or so degrees which make for some hot sand and rocks. I want to make some huaraches by your instructions. I have two questions first where do you get the vibram sole material and second, I notice on your sandals and in the pictures of the guys you learned from the toes hang a little over the front of the sole, is this the way they should be cut? Or am I just getting the wrong idea from the pictures. Thanks for any help. Mike

Saturday, May 26, 2007

 
Blogger Barefoot Ted said...

Howdy Mike

I want the toes to be able to stick out the front of sandal. Just a little when relaxed, but able to dig into the ground when going up steep, loose terrain.

The material is Vibram's Cherry soling material. It is available through some wholesale shoe repair outfits.

I am now offering a kit that includes enough soling material for a pair of sandals along with the hemp twine for $20.00 plus shipping.

Barefoot Ted's Adventures
11001 Peoria St.
Sun Valley, CA 91352

BFT

Saturday, May 26, 2007

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What is your job besides selling these huaraches?

Monday, May 28, 2007

 
Blogger Barefoot Ted said...

Selling these huaraches has made me VERY rich:-)

BFT

PS. Plus I have some other small companies.

Monday, May 28, 2007

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ted, first of all: great work. You really are an inspiration to me.

I have three questions, if I may. First: how about making the huaraches with a leather sole? I would say that is less slippery with sweat, and it served the indians well for several thousand years.....

Second: I am thinking of a way to put these sandals on and off very quickly, by using velcro straps, the way 'mainstream' sandals are made. Do you see big problems with that? What 'pros' of the traditional huarache tie style would I lose?

Third: do you still use your VFF or have you switched completely to these sandals?

Thanks! Pieter Hogendoorn

Tuesday, May 29, 2007

 
Blogger Barefoot Ted said...

Howdy Pieter

Yes, leather soles are a possibility.

I know that the Tarahumara have a deer hide version of their sandals, but they are worn more for rituals and special occassions.

I am sure that they went to rubber (old tires) because rubber lasts a lot longer.

I like the 4mm Vibram soles because it gives the benefit of rubber along with great flexibility.

My longterm goal is to create a totally organic and plant-based running sandal using hemp or yucca.

I still love my FiveFingers. Although it is much more exciting to create my own footwear.

BFT

Tuesday, May 29, 2007

 
Blogger Barefoot Ted said...

Save money and water. Wear your hemp-strapped huaraches while swimming and when you take a shower.

They feel fresh after being cleaned and the hemp becomes a little snugger.

The rubber doesn't stink up (thanks air and sun) and the hemp doesn't rot (thanks ...).

BFT

Tuesday, May 29, 2007

 

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